The Robbers by J.C.F. Schiller 1781 (Preface)

Whoever proposes to discourage vice and to vindicate religion, morality, and social order against their enemies, must unveil crime in all its deformity, and place it before the eyes of men in its colossal magnitude; he must diligently explore its dark mazes, and make himself familiar with sentiments at the wickedness of which his soul revolts. … More The Robbers by J.C.F. Schiller 1781 (Preface)

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Leibniz on Faith with Reason 1710 (Theodicy)

Little by little Aristotle took the place of Plato, when the taste for systems began to prevail, and when theology itself became more systematic, owing to the decisions of the General Councils, which provided precise and positive formularies. A little before these changes, and before the great schism in the West (1054) that still endures, there was in Italy a sect of philosophers which disputed this conformity of faith with reason which I maintain.
They were dubbed ‘Averroists’. … More Leibniz on Faith with Reason 1710 (Theodicy)

Conversation Between an Enlightened and an Unenlightened Soul by Jakob Böhme 1624

A poor soul had walked out of paradise, and had arrived in the realm of this world.

The devil encountered her and spoke to her: “Where will you go, you half-blind soul?”

The soul spoke: “I want to observe the creatures of the world, who have been made by the Creator.” … More Conversation Between an Enlightened and an Unenlightened Soul by Jakob Böhme 1624

What did Kierkegaard want?

“I Johannes Climacus, (one of his pseudonyms) born and bred in this city and now thirty years old, an ordinary human being like most folk, assume that a highest good, called an eternal happiness, awaits me just as it awaits a housemaid and a professor. I have heard that Christianity is one prerequisite for this good. I now ask how I may enter into relation to this doctrine.” It is Christianity itself that compels me. … More What did Kierkegaard want?

On Knowledge and Ignorance by Bishop Joseph Butler 1692-1752

Our own nature, and the objects we are surrounded with, serve to raise our curiosity; but we are quite out of a condition of satisfying it. Every secret which is disclosed, every discovery which is made, every new effect which is brought to view, serves to convince us of numberless more which remain concealed, and which we had before no suspicion of. … More On Knowledge and Ignorance by Bishop Joseph Butler 1692-1752

The Vanity of Arts and Sciences by Henry Cornelius Agrippa 1486-1535

The Grammarians will rail at me: the Etymologists will derive my name from the Gout: the mad Poets will call me Goat and Momus; the frivolous Historians will profane me beyond Pausanias or Herostratus: the obstreperous Rhetoricians will plague me with their big Words and mimical Gestures: the quarrelsome Logicians will confound me with their Syllogisms. … More The Vanity of Arts and Sciences by Henry Cornelius Agrippa 1486-1535